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husband was another international guy. he was in indonesia. she met him at the university of hawaii. he was from the east-west center. brought americans the honolulu to prepare to go to asia for study. and that's where she met him. he was a tennis player. she fell in love with lolo. >> host: at what point did the move to jakarta? >> guest: he went back first. you know, both barack, sr. and lolo were constantly being watched by the ins and different regulations, and so lolo could only stay for a certain amount of time. he kept trying to extend his visa after he married her, and found ways to stay. so we got certain jobs that were related to geography and topography in honolulu to keep them there, but eventually things were changing and very dramatic political ways. he was back in 1966. in 1967, in october, barry obama and his mother moved back to indonesia. >> host: so the president lived in jakarta indonesia from 67-71, ages six through 10? >> guest: just about, yes. about four years. >> host: while you were in jakarta, david maraniss, you found a school where barack obama went to schoo
is in indonesia in the west new guinea. it's owned by the people that own bisbee. now you know, they run the mine and they will come in and play pool and they are nice guys. i think it was chris hedges that said the people that are destroying the world are just doing a job. they are nice people. in indonesia in this mine they are not just destroying the place, people are dying in this mine, they have hired the military to become the private service of the mine which is illegal by the way under the u.s. law. they were busted by the clinton administration, stripped of insurance, but they have henry kissinger on the door, so they got everything worked out. this has 18,000 people working at 15,000 feet. straight down through glacier. it's the biggest gold mine and basically the biggest cotton - the world. but, people are shocked. there's a huge battle going on because they're putting 300,000 tons of waste every single day in the two rivers without, like in america you can't do that. but there you just play with on and it doesn't matter. so, what you are asking is to be pushed off and if you do you pu
, places like pakistan and indonesia and so on. but also through christians she has met who have a direct experience with this. this story is also powerfully documented. one further point, general point i wanted to make about this book, to raise a general question, to whom is this book addressed and who might benefit from it? many people, and i think it's a very suitable gift for the holidays -- [laughter] i hope people will go out and buy it. it's a very informative and moving book and it's very unique because lela is a very good writer. i would say that there are several appropriate lines. first writing as a christian american, it is natural that one of her audience the christian americans are at least other non-jewish americans. and since it's you know, it describes a good deal of what jewish life is like in israel and left me say about this, she is markedly well-informed, testament to our own curiosity in the hospitality she found by the israelis. i should say perhaps there are a number of aspects of israeli life even specifically jewish experiences which may be largely unknown to ame
the country has political resolve, it can make extraordinary resolve with assistance from others. indonesia, perhaps my favorite example. there the government has dedicated itself to creating a civilian leader -- legal structure of law enforcement institutions to fight terrorism. indonesia has scored more than 100 consecutive convictions in terrorist cases and the police has had major successes in breaking up terrorist cells linked to violent extremist organizations. many of us saw -- thought at the time several years ago that indonesia hung in the balance. no one thinks that now. the capacity building can work. we must continue to innovate and improve our efficacy. i said at the outset that we were determined to do a better job in countering the violent extremism. the miti about our efforts to legitimize the narrative. we established the center for strategic counter-terrorism communications. house at the state department, it is a true interest agency endeavor with the mandate from president obama. they do many things including working with our embassies on a range of activities to undermin
they can make extraordinary strides for the assistance from others. let me cite one example. indonesia, perhaps my favorite example, there the government has dedicated itself to creating the civilian legal structure in law enforcement institutions to fight terrorism effectively, comprehensively, and using the rule of law. in disease has scored more than 100 conservative convictions in terrorist cases and the national police has major successes in breaking up terrorist cells linked to other violent extremists ors and anyone who thinks back eight or nine years or even a decade will remember that many of sauce it athe time indonesia hung in the balance and unlikely to survive. nobody thinks that now. any discussion of the ct landscape of southeast asia is frequently omitted. the play here is the capacity building can work and we must count to innovate. to improve our advocacy. i said at the outset that at the beginning of the administration, we were determined to did a better job of countering violent extremism. let me tell you about our efforts to legitimize the terrorist narrative. unde
from others. but me cite one example. indonesia, perhaps my favorite example. if the government has dedicated itself to creating civilian legal structures and law enforcement institutions to fight terrorism effect in late, comprehensively and within the rule of law. indonesia has scored more than 100 consecutive convictions in terrorist cases for national places had major successes in breaking up terrorist future muslim yet another violent extremists organizations. anyone who thinks back eight or nine years for a decade will remember many of us thought at the time and did misha hung in the balance and was unlikely to survive his bout with extremism. no one thinks that now had any discussion of the landscape in southeast asia is frequently admitted. the point here is capacity building can work it must continue innovate to prove efficacy. it said at the outset that the beginning of the administration were determined to better java countering violent extremism. so then they tell you of our efforts to delegitimize the terrorist narrative. undersecretary clinton's leadership established
guy, lolo soetoro from indonesia. he had come there to the east-west center which brought students from various asian countries to hawaii and brought americans to honolulu to the same center who were prepared to go to asia for different studies. and that's where she met him. he was a tennis player. he was very gregarious at that time and she fell in love with lolo. >> host: at what point did they move to jakarta? >> guest: she went back first. he had been there, you know both barack senior and lolo are constantly be washed by the ins for different regulations on visas and so on. so lolo could only stay for a certain amount of time. he can try to extend his visa after he married her and find out ways to save. because certain jobs he said were related to the geography he had learned and topography in honolulu to keep them there. eventually indonesia was changing and dramatic, political wave and he was forced back in 1966. make to 67 and a covert, barry obama and his mother and so tarot booth that. >> host:
from? people think it comes from switzer land. it's coming from farmers in africa and in indonesia and in central and south america. >> reporter: he believes that americans will be willing to pay more for chocolate if they know that in turn impoverished farmers will earn more. of all places, why congo? >> why congo? well, it was really ben affleck's fault. >> reporter: yes, that ben affleck. >> like this? that's well fermted. this isn't. >> reporter: earlier this year, we joined ben affleck and joe on a trip to the d.r.c., cocoa can only grow within a narrow climate zone close to the equator. in 2009 affleck started a charity called eastern congo initiative to spur economic development in this war-torn region. five million people have died here due to decades of conflict. >> as i was reading, i just sort of stumbled upon some of these statistics. i was struck not only by the numbers but by the fact that i hadn't heard about it. >> reporter: so affleck decided to use his celebrity as a sort of currency to attract investment. he led a small group of philanthropists, protected by arme
including the largest, indonesia, in which the muslims participate in the democracy and you have the political parties within that system, so i think when we have discussions especially these days given the turmoil in the middle east we are very focused on the 20% of the muslim world and six and ten of the muslims live in the pacific region and we need to keep their experiences in mind and think about the death of their experiences, but the main point which i think we all agree on is there is nothing and it is anti-democratic about islam in terms of political culture and needing more than christianity or judea's some so we agree on that point. second, and this is where we disagree. given the middle east which i think we are going to focus on today, the crushing social democratic economic political pressures in the societies are facing a change is coming and i've lived in this part of the world for five years back in 1990 and i go back regularly and support the notion as it is crafted in part because i think it is like debating how gravity. you see the early results in some, not m
to achieve what they wanted. from indonesia to chile, from east germany to; authoritarian regimes have been supplanted by flourishing free societies in just about every corner of the earth. and we in the united states and everybody in the world are a lot better off for it. unfortunately, that can't be said of russia, and that's why this magnitsky act is so important to adopt, despite the democratic setbacks in russia that i've just described, the repressive acts by its government, i remain confident that the future of this great people does not belong to those who would impose upon them a seus tim of -- a system of tyranny, of corruption, of abuse with impunity. the future of russia belongs to russians who believe that they have a right to decide their destiny for themselves. to the russian people who are sick of corruption and who demand the rule of law: fairness, justice under law, in short it belongs to people like the late sergei magnitsky whose name will be immortalized when we pass this legislation. in supporting this legislation, my friends, we stand with them in their noble cause. t
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10

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